Medical Insurance Analysis

When it comes to health insurance, there’s a lot on the line. For one, it’s a literal matter of life and death. Whether it be a fatal illness, a shorter life expectancy, or a lower quality of life, a medical problem can seriously derail one’s life if not taken care of, both medically and financially. Insurance, while prohibitively expensive, is ultimately far less expensive than the costs of one’s medical expenses, so it’s not only preferred but essentially necessary for the modern human. However, many go without insurance due to poverty, leaving them vulnerable. I, myself, was without medical  insurance until recently, and I am a walking litany of medical problems, so I know first hand. This was also the time during which I came to own another possession I long went without, my AT&T cell phone, and I came to depend on them both heavily as my declining health was at a breaking point, and I spent days in a hospital before going to a series of follow up appointments. But, I digress. My main point here is that I personally believe, both morally and logically, that medical insurance should be free to all, and I have an interesting reason for that.

You see, most people talk about medical insurance mostly as an economic problem, which it seems to be. However, I first would like to point out that it is a human rights issue. The reasons for this are many, but let’s stick to the most logical and scientific reason. We as human beings are products of evolution, and evolution functions via two main properties, random chance and the fight for survival. Genes are randomly mutated during reproduction, and if those mutations are advantageous, they get passed on. However, modern humans face an interesting dilemma. As with so many things, humans are the first species (that we know of) to break this cycle of evolution . With the invention of medicine, along with other modern amenities, human beings are able to survive things they otherwise wouldn’t, things they aren’t “supposed to.” What ‘I mean by this is that, thanks to medicine, the strength or weakness of a given mutation is largely irrelevant. Therefore, bad mutations aren’t eliminated from the gene pool. This means that we can pick up all sorts of congenital disorders that would have killed us without modern amenities and then pass them on to our children. So, essentially, we’re just getting more ill and prone to illness over time because we’re keeping all of the changes made by random mutations.